Albert Kahn: 400 Buildings in Metro Detroit

Albert Kahn: 400 Buildings in Metro Detroit

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301. Thomas H. Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research (1925-1927)

102 N. Observatory @ E. Medical Center Dr, University of Michigan Hospital Campus, Ann Arbor

Source: http://bentley.umich.edu/legacy-support/campus_tour/buildingslist.php

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[Below: An historical photograph of the Thomas H. Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research reprinted from http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094]

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302. Nina Moses Burton Residence (1925)

2025 Seneca, Ann Arbor

Source: “Washtenaw/Hill/Geddes Historic District, Phase III, Ann Arbor, Michigan”, Julia M. Truettner, April 1995. Click here to see this PDF document.

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303. Detroit Railway & Harbor Terminals Warehouse (1925)

4461 W. Jefferson, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 55

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[Below: An historical image of the Detroit Railway & Harbor Terminals Warehouse. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo.]

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304. Campau Realty Building (c.1925; Cliff Bell’s interior by Charles Agree c.1934)

2030 Park Ave, Detroit

Source: Framed Charles Agree Portrait with biographical inscription inside Cliff Bell’s. Sure, we could come up with something more official, but this source is just plain more fun, even though the inscription incorrectly identifies Agree as the designer of Lee Plaza on West Grand Blvd. It was really Charles Noble if anyone cares to know. Don Bauman of Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. tells us the foundation of this two-story structure was designed to support at least 10 more floors that were obviously never built.

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[An historical rendering of the Campau Building showing the floors that were never built. Reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, October 19, 1924.]

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305. Clara Ford Nurses Home at Henry Ford Hospital (c.1925)

7470 Byron, Detroit

Source: “The Architectural Forum”, 1929, Vol. 50, Page iv-v

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306. Detroit News Garage (c.1924)

Southwest corner of Lafayette & 3rd, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 22

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307. Ralph & Mary Stone Residence aka “Stonelea” now known as Cranbrook Lyon House (c.1925)

945 Cranbrook Rd, Bloomfield Hills

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Photo © Dale Carlson and Cranbrook Educational Community; Published with Permission from Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

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308. Ralph & Mary Stone Residence aka “Stonelea” now known as Cranbrook Lyon House ~ Guest Cottage & 3-Car Garage (c.1925)

945 Cranbrook Rd, Bloomfield Hills

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Photo © Dale Carlson and Cranbrook Educational Community; Published with Permission from Cranbrook Center for Collections and Research.

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309. Bernard Schwartz Cigar Company Plant (1925; demolished 1981)

2180 E. Milwaukee, Detroit

Source: http://www.historic-structures.com/mi/detroit/schwartz_cigar.php; digital images snipped from same

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310. Clara Gagnier Booth Headstone (1925)

Greenwood Cemetery, Oak & Hazelwood, Birmingham

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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311. Henry Wood  Booth Headstone (1925)

Greenwood Cemetery, Oak & Hazelwood, Birmingham

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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312. Paige-Detroit Motor Company Offices (1925; half of building demolished)

8505 W. Warren, Dearborn

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 28

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313. Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company Offices & Warehouse (c.1926)

5757 Trumbull, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 6

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[Below: A clipping of the Westinghouse Offices & Warehouse reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, May 9, 1927]

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314. Central Savings Bank Branch aka Word of Life Church (c.1925)

Northeast corner of Kercheval & Alter, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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315. Central Savings Bank Branch now known as Discount Beauty Supply (c.1925)

Northwest corner of Gratiot & Greiner, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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316. Central Savings Bank Branch now known as First Church of  the Redeemed (c.1925)

Southeast corner of Van Dyke & Knodell, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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317. Percy & Anna Evans Residence (c.1925)

1541 Balmoral, Detroit

Source: http://issuu.com/cbwm/docs/pw_walking_tour_final_2012

Our source tells us this residence “MAY” be an Albert Kahn design. Let’s hope so. We’ll choose to believe it is for the time being, if only to include our photo of this gorgeous Palmer Woods home. A former owner contacted us back in November of 2016 and attests to having seen with his own eyes, years ago, actual AKA, Inc. blueprints that confirm the origin of this home’s design.

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318. Johns Dalrymple Walker Lincoln Dealership (c.1925; demolished)

E. Jefferson & Lieb, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Digital image snipped from: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094

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[Below: An article relating details of the Johns Dalrymple Walker Lincoln Dealership’s upcoming construction; reprinted from “The Detroiter”, August 4, 1924.]

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319. Murray Body Corporation Plant aka Russell Industrial Center – Building One (c.1928)

Approximately 7600 US Interstate 75 North Service Dr, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936 pg. 10

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320. Murray Body Corporation Plant aka Russell Industrial Center – Building Two (c.1928)

Approximately 7700 US Interstate 75 North Service Dr, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936 pg. 10

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321. Walbri Court Apartments (c.1926)

1001 Covington, Detroit

Source: “Michigan History”, Michigan Department of State, Vols. 65-66, 1981, pg. 30

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[Below: A clipping of the Walbri Court Apartments reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, September 20, 1925]

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322. Central Savings Bank Branch now known as Chase Bank Branch (c.1926)

18203 Fenkell @ Ashton & Grand River, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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323. Senator James J. Couzens Bloomfield Hills Residence aka Wabeek Manor (1926-1927)

3550 Wabeek Lake Dr East, Bloomfield Hills

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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324. University Museums Building now known as Alexander G. Ruthven Building (1926-1928)

1109 Geddes @ N. University, University of Michigan Central Campus, Ann Arbor

Source: http://bentley.umich.edu/legacy-support/campus_tour/buildingslist.php

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[Below: An historical photograph of the University of Michigan Art Exhibitions Building reprinted from http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094]

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325. Franklin Hills Country Club Clubhouse (1926)

Northwest corner of 13 Mile & Inkster, Farmington Hills

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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326. Franklin Hills Country Club Caddy Shack (c.1926)

Northwest corner of 13 Mile & Inkster, Farmington Hills

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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327. Franklin Hills Country Club Service Building No. 1 (c.1926)

Northwest corner of 13 Mile & Inkster, Farmington Hills

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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328. Franklin Hills Country Club Service Building No. 2 (c.1926)

Northwest corner of 13 Mile & Inkster, Farmington Hills

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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329. Michigan Hospital for Crippled Children now known as Botsford Senior Living Center – Building Two (1926)

21450 Archwood Circle, Farmington Hills

Source: https://botsfordcommons.org/history/

In this spot, between June of 2013 and March of 2018, I♥DM erroneously published a photograph of the wrong building on the grounds of Botsford Senior Living Center. Please see entry #454 in our list of “Errors & Corrections” on page 5 for a thorough explanation of our gaffe.

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330. Chevrolet Motor Car Company Building now known as Detroit University Preparatory Academy Elementary School (1926; radically altered)

435 Amsterdam, Detroit

Source: “Proposed New Amsterdam Historic District Final Report”, Detroit City Council Historic Designation Advisory Board, 2001, pg. 3. Find all digitized Detroit City Council Historic Designation Advisory Board final reports here: https://detroitmi.gov/webapp/local-historic-district-map.

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331. Residence, Unknown Name (c.1926)

25831 Salem, Huntington Woods

Source: The owners of this lovely Huntington Woods residence tell us they’ve visited the Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. archives and personally viewed the historic lot development drawings that prove the design came out of Kahn’s offices.

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332. Maccabees Building aka Detroit School Center Building (1927)

5057 Woodward, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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[Below: Four historical photographs of the Maccabees Building reprinted from http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094]

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333. Packard Proving Grounds Gate Lodge (1927)

49965 Van Dyke, Shelby Township

Source: http://shelbyhistory.tripod.com/id14.html

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334. General Motors Corporation Plant now known as DetMar Corporation Plant (c.1927)

Southwest corner of Vermont & Alexandrine, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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335. Walter J. Bemb Cadillac aka Dalgleish Cadillac Showroom (1927)

6160 Cass, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 169

(Eds.: A recent renovation has radically altered this structure’s appearance from that shown in our photo, 10/20)

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336. Richards Oakland/Pontiac Dealership Building now known as TechTown: TechOne: Wayne State Research And Technology Park (1927)

440 Burroughs, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 169

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[Below: A clipping of the Richards Oakland/Pontiac Dealership Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, May 15, 1927]

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337. Fort Shelby Hotel Tower Addition (1927)

525-527 W. Lafayette, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pgs. 84-85

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338. Woman’s Hospital (1927-1929)

Hancock @ Brush, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

From June of 2013 to March of 2018 I♥DM erroneously reported the location of this structure as Beaubien & Forest.

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339. Jerome H. Remick Residence (c.1927)

257 Ridge Rd, Grosse Pointe Farms

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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340. Old Ford Motor Company Administration Building (1927; demolished 1997)

Approximately 3600 Schaefer Rd, Dearborn

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 23

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photos

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[Below: An historical photograph of the Old Ford Motor Company Administration Building reprinted from http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094]

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341. Fisher Building (1928)

3011 W. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

This structure, widely considered Kahn’s best commercial work, and the William Livingstone Memorial Lighthouse on Belle Isle (entry #379) both feature extensive exterior sculpture by Hungarian master, Géza Maróti.

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342. Herman Kiefer Hospital Main Building (1927-1928)

1151 Taylor, Detroit

Source: “Final Report: Proposed Herman Kiefer Hospital Historic District”, Detroit City Council Historic Designation Advisory Board, 2004, pgs. 7, 11. Find all digitized Detroit City Council Historic Designation Advisory Board final reports here: https://detroitmi.gov/webapp/local-historic-district-map.

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[Below: A clipping of the Herman Kiefer Hospital Main Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, August 21, 1927]

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343. Brush Building at Harper Hospital (1928)

Inner Mall of Detroit Medical Center just SE of John R & Alexandrine [Best viewed from the west side of the top floor of the Children’s Hospital parking ramp at approximately 3845 Beaubien], Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pgs. 120-121

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[Below: A clipping of the Brush Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, June 19, 1927]

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344. Wabeek Building (1928)

Northwest corner of Maple & Bates, Birmingham

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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[Below: A clipping of the Wabeek Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, March 4, 1928]

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345. General Motors Building Research Laboratory (c.1928)

Northwest corner of 2nd & Milwaukee, Detroit

Source: “The Architectural Forum: Industrial Buildings Albert Kahn”, August 1938

Photo by Michael G. Smith

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346. Joseph Kahn Residence (1928)

26637 York, Huntington Woods

Source: “City of Huntington Woods Historic District Study Committee Final Report

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347. Investment Properties Company Office Building now known as A’s Liquor-Lotto (1928)

8544-8560 Grand River, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, June 3, 1928, Pg. 68

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[Below: An illustration of the Investment Properties Company Building reprinted from the June 3, 1928 issue of the Detroit Free Press.]

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348. Beecher, Peck & Lewis Warehouse (1928; portion of original design either demolished or unbuilt)

1313 E. Milwaukee, Detroit

Source: Detroit Times, March 25, 1928 pg. 15 AND April 1, 1928 pg. 49

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[Below: An illustration of the Beecher, Peck & Lewis Warehouse reprinted from the April 1, 1928 issue of the Detroit Times.]

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349. Chrysler Highland Park Plant – Engineering Building (1928; demolished)

Near Davison & Oakland, Highland Park

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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350. Alvin Macauley Residence (1928; demolished 1973)

735 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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351. Detroit Y.W.C.A. Building (1928-1929; demolished)

2230 Witherell @ Montcalm, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan; photo reprinted from same

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[An additional historical image of the Old Y.W.C.A. Building at Witherell & Montcalm. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo.]

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352. Plymouth Motor Corporation Lynch Road Assembly Plant – Multiple Buildings (1928; demolished)

6334 Lynch Rd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings of Michigan”, Kathryn Bishop Eckert, pg. 98

Digital image snipped from: http://www.allpar.com/corporate/factories/lynch-road.html

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353. Packard Proving Grounds Repair Garage (1928)

49965 Van Dyke, Shelby Township

Source: http://shelbyhistory.tripod.com/id14.html

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354. First National Bank Building Addition (1928)

660 Woodward, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

The First National Bank Building was built in two stages. The portions of the structure built in 1922 include all that faces Woodward and Campus Martius plus the length of the eleven westernmost dual window bays along Cadillac Square (entry #257). The remaining portions, facing Cadillac Square, Bates Street and E. Congress, were built in 1928.

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[Below: A lovely shot by Michael G. Smith that captures in their entirety the First National Bank’s original wing (entry #257), its 1928 addition (entry #354), and in the foreground, the Vinton Building (entry #203).]

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355. Griswold Building aka “The Albert” (1929)

1214 Griswold, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 76

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[Below: A clipping of the Griswold Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, February 26, 1928]

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356. Detroit Y.M.C.A. Fisher Branch aka New Center Community Mental Health (1929)

2051 W. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Michigan Manufacturer and Financial Record”, 1928, Vol. 41, pg. 12

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[Below: A clipping of the Fisher Branch Y.M.C.A. reprinted from the Detroit Times, May 4, 1928]

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357. Detroit Sheet Metal Works Plant (c.1929)

1200 Oakman, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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358. S.S. Kresge World Headquarters aka Michigan Center For High Technology (c.1929)

2727 2nd Ave, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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[Below: A clipping of the Kresge Headquarters reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, May 18, 1930]

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359. Miller-Judd Company Sales & Service Building now known as Wayne State University Facilities Planning & Management Building (c.1929)

5454 Cass, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Photo by Michael G. Smith

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[Below: An historical photo of the Miller-Judd Company Sales & Service Building. Digital image snipped from: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094]

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360. Detroit Times Newspaper Building (1929; demolished)

1370 Cass, Detroit

Source: “American Architect and Architecture”, March 1930, Vol. 137, pg. 47

Digital image snipped from: http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094

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[Below: An additional historical image of the Detroit Times Building. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo.]

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361. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – Main Residence (1929)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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362. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – Powerhouse (1929)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: “Edsel & Eleanor Ford House”, James A. Bridenstine, Published by the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate, 1988, pgs. 80-83

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363. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – Pool House/Recreation Building (1929)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: “Edsel & Eleanor Ford House”, James A. Bridenstine, Published by the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate, 1988, pgs. 80-83

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364. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – South Cottage & Gatehouse (1929)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: “Edsel & Eleanor Ford House”, James A. Bridenstine, Published by the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate, 1988, pgs. 80-83

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365. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – North Gate Service Building (1929)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: “Edsel & Eleanor Ford House”, James A. Bridenstine, Published by the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate, 1988, pgs. 80-83

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366. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – Tool & Implement Shed now known as the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate Visitor’s Center (1929; radically altered and enlarged)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: “Edsel & Eleanor Ford House”, James A. Bridenstine, Published by the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate, 1988, pgs. 80-83

(Eds., 10/20: The land upon which this structure stands has been recently subjected to a massive renovation that has not yet been unveiled to the public. We suspect this building has been mostly if not completely demolished, but can’t say for certain. We intend to update this entry in the Spring of 2021 or when construction at this site ceases, whichever comes first.)

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367. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – Boat House (1929; demolished)

1100 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: Informational placard located inside the Pool House/Recreation Building at the Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate AND Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan; photo is a segment of the aforementioned informational placard.

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368. Ypsilanti State Hospital – Multiple Buildings (1929-1931; demolished 2008)

Platt & Willis Rd, York Township

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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[Below: An additional historical image of the Ypsilanti State Hospital snipped from: http://www.asylumprojects.org/index.php?title=Ypsilanti_State_Hospital]

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369. Packard Proving Grounds Carriage House (c. late 1920s)

49965 Van Dyke, Shelby Township

Source: http://shelbyhistory.tripod.com/id14.html

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370. Packard Sales and Service Building (1929; demolished)

Jefferson Ave @ Lakepointe, Grosse Pointe

Source: “Michigan Manufacturer & Financial Record”, July 27, 1929, pg. 9; photo reprinted from same

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

 

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371. People’s Outfitting Company Warehouse (c.1929)

14225 W. Warren, Dearborn

Source: “The Detroiter”, June 3, 1929

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372. Shaarey Zedek Synagogue aka Greater Bethlehem Temple (c.1929)

2900 Chicago Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings of Michigan”, Kathryn Bishop Eckert, pg. 97

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373. Kelsey-Hayes Wheel Corporation Plant (c.1929; mostly demolished, remaining buildings are derelict)

McGraw & Military, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

We can’t say for certain, but based upon its appearance in September of 2020, it appears that the last remnants of this factory complex will be razed by the close of the year.

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374. Krolik Family Tombstone (c.1929)

Section North F, Woodmere Cemetery, 9400 W. Fort, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Of the handful of Krolik family memorials at Woodmere Cemetery, we believe the one shown in our photo most closely fits the description of the Krolik memorial reported in the “Albert Kahn Era Projects” list. Our opinion rests heavily upon the date of Ida G.B. Krolik’s death, 1928. It is the only interment we have found amongst the Krolik memorials at Woodmere with a date of death that closely matches the commission’s reported date of 1929. To the best of our knowledge, Henry & Ida were cousins of Albert’s in-laws.

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375. Stark-Hickey Cadillac Sales & Service Building (1929)

8461 Grand River, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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376. Dearborn State Bank Addition (c.1929)

22101 Michigan Ave @ Mason, Dearborn

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Shortly before this building’s construction the prior Dearborn State Bank Branch Building (entry #189) at this location was moved approximately 120 feet to the south and rotated 90 degrees, so that its facade faces Mason St, where it still stands today, connected to this addition.

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377. Grace Hospital Nurses’ Home (1929; demolished)

John R & Alexandrine, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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378. Argonaut Building (1930)

485 W. Milwaukee, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 176

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379. William Livingstone Memorial Lighthouse (1930)

Eastern extreme of Belle Isle, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pgs. 264-265

This structure and the Fisher Building (entry #341) both feature extensive exterior sculpture by Hungarian master, Géza Maróti.

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380. Henry E. Edwards Residence (c.1930)

520 Aspen, Birmingham

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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381. Edsel & Eleanor Ford Estate at Gaukler Pointe – Head Housekeeper’s Residence aka Theo A. McGraw Residence (c.1929)

1017 Lake Shore Dr, Grosse Pointe Shores

Source: Grosse Pointe Realtors Association Listing Card, September 16, 1953

At one time, four properties reported as Kahn designs by Grosse Pointe Realtors Association listing cards populated our list. One by one, the listing cards have proven to be woefully inaccurate. 1017 Lake Shore Drive is the only one of those four residences for which the GPRA reported an accurate architectural attribution. The listing card in question is included below our photo of this residence.

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382. H.J. Heinz Company Warehouse (c.1930)

North side of Joy just east of Livernois, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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383. Samuel Francis Smith Memorial Flagpole (1931)

Near corner of Vista & The Strand, Belle Isle, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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[Below: A clipping of the Smith Memorial Flagpole reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, April 19, 1931]

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384. Dearborn Inn (1931)

20301 Oakwood, Dearborn

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pgs. 334-335

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385. Albert Kahn Building aka New Center Building (1931)

7430 2nd Ave, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pgs. 178-179

Photo by Michael G. Smith

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[Below: An historical photograph of the Albert Kahn Building reprinted from http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094]

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[Below: A clipping of the Albert Kahn Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, September 28, 1930]

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386. Richman Brothers Company Store Building (1931)

Northwest corner of Woodward & Clifford, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 41

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387. Chidren’s Aid Society Hospital (1931; demolished)

71 W. Warren Ave, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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388. Dearborn Inn – Alexandria Ballroom & Banquet Hall Addition (1932)

20301 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn

Source: “Images of America: Dearborn Inn”, Jennifer Czerwick Ganem, Arcadia Publishing, 2011, pgs. 69-73

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389. WWJ Broadcasting Studios aka Walker-Roehrig Building (c.1935)

600 W. Lafayette, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 34 AND Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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390. Ford Motor Company “Century Of Progress” aka “Rotunda” Building (Originally built in Chicago, 1934; moved to Dearborn, re-built and altered, 1936; burned and demolished, 1962)

Approximately 3601 Schaefer Rd, Dearborn

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 23

Digital image snipped from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kbreenbo/262362948/

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[Below: An aerial shot of the Ford Rotunda Building and the Old Ford Motor Company Administration Building (entry #340), reprinted from “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936.]

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391. Chrysler Sales and Service Building (1934; demolished)

Near Jefferson & Connors, Detroit

Source: “Industrial & Commercial Buildings”, Albert Kahn, Inc., 1936, pg. 37; photo reprinted from same

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392. Marx Brewery Buildings (c.1934; demolished)

Van Alstyne (formerly Front Street) between Oak & Elm, Wyandotte

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Digital image snipped from a now defunct website

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393. Moritz Kahn Residence (c.1935)

1611 Lincolnshire, Detroit

Source: http://issuu.com/cbwm/docs/pw_walking_tour_final_2012

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394. Ford Motor Company River Rouge Complex – Tire Plant (1936)

3001 Miller Rd, Dearborn

Source: “Albert Kahn: Builder of Detroit”, Roger Matuz, Great Lakes Books / Wayne State University Press, 2002, pg. 99

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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[Below: An historical image of the Rouge Tire Plant’s interior. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo.]

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395. Burton Memorial Tower (1936)

230 S. Ingalls, University of Michigan Central Campus, Ann Arbor

Source: “Buildings of Michigan”, Kathryn Bishop Eckert, pg. 145

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396. Ann Arbor News Building now known as University of Michigan Credit Union (1936)

340 E. Huron, Ann Arbor

Source: “Michigan History”, George Newman Fuller and Lewis Beeson, Michigan Historical Commission, Vol. 29, 1945, pg. 100

Featuring numerous relief panels by Italian-American sculptor Corrado Parducci

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397. Fred & Maude Black Residence (1936)

21551 Cherry Hill St, Dearborn

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

This residence has been altered so extensively that it bears no resemblance whatsoever to its original appearance.

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398. Burroughs Adding Machine Company Plant aka Unisys Plant (1936-1937)

Northeast corner of Plymouth & Haggerty, Plymouth Township

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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399. Burroughs Adding Machine Company Plant – Powerhouse (1936-1937)

Northeast corner of Plymouth & Haggerty, Plymouth Township

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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400. Dearborn Inn – Helps’ Dormitory (1936)

20301 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn

Source: “Images of America: Dearborn Inn”, Jennifer Czerwick Ganem, Arcadia Publishing 2011, pg. 75

We’re only 95% certain this structure was designed by Kahn. Anyone care to drop a line and convince us beyond any doubt?

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Dale Carlson

Dale Carlson grew up along the northeastern shores of Lake Michigan, where at a young age Detroit called out to him in his dreams. In 2008, after extended stays in ten different Michigan cities, the author settled permanently in southeast Oakland County where he currently lives and works in various capacities within the local real estate industry.

44 thoughts on “Albert Kahn: 400 Buildings in Metro Detroit

  1. phenomenal- we love Albert Kahn here in Walkerville- as you can see he launched his career here (second commission)

    1. These are higher resolution images. Also, how does the Det News slideshow with 33 images equal the 400 high res images here?

      It cannot.

  2. This is awesome! My dad worked as an apprentice to Albert Kahn as a young man. He told me that Kahn was color blind and when he rode with him he had to tell him what color the traffic lights were. He loved it and would have stayed but the depression hit. He got a job with Chrysler, eventually becoming an engineer (without a degree). He worked there until he retired in 1973. He passed away on January 8, 2013 at the age of 99.

    1. Your Dad sounds like he was an amazing guy, Kathy! I imagine he earned all 40 years of that retirement! Lol! Thanks so much for reading what we believe is our best post ever. Glad you enjoyed it! D~

  3. Excellent article. Have a question about a potential Kahn building not among the 400. How can i contact you?

  4. I’ve actually seen a brochure published by Ford Motor Co., promoting the River Rouge plant when it was brand new (twenties?), possibly it may have photos, paintings, or drawings showing the Kahn buildings?
    Unfortunately, like so much of Detroit’s heritage, so many of Kahn’s buildings are gone. Even better-known (nationally/internationally) architects like Wright suffered the same fate, and were demolished for parking lots, etc., before the value of their work was recgonized. As a Canadian, I note he designed a lot of buildings also in Windsor & vicinity!

  5. Hello Dale:

    Was wondering if you have information on a building claimed to be an Albert Kahn design at 1745 E. Grand Boulevard. Some folks think it was a Packard building as it is very close to the Packard Plant.

    By the way, I am the president of the Packard Motor Car Foundation and if you want better photos of our Kahn buildings, then I want to invite you to our Open House on Sunday, October 19 from 1;00 PM to 5:00 PM. If I had your e-mail, then I could send you a flyer.

    Sincerely, Roger Luksik

    1. Sorry Roger, We’re currently on hiatus here at ILDM due to the health concerns of our biggest benefactor. Wish I could’ve made it to your open house, but we haven’t logged on in weeks and are just now seeing your comment for the first time. Perhaps the next one??

  6. We have been told our home is an Albert Kahn Home. The original owner was a friend of Edsel Ford. It is a 10,000 sq. foot home in Flint, built in 1929. Can you tell us how we can verify if it is an Albert Kahn home? I did send a picture to the listed email address. THANK YOU

  7. According to Zillow, the home located at 185 Dourdan in Bloomfield Hills, MI (the original mansion on the estate before the land was subdivided) is an Albert Kahn design. Not sure how to confirm this though…

    1. Thanks for your comment, Nick. My first recommendation would be to contact the current listing agent and personally ask them for the source of their claim. I can tell you that I own a very thorough list of Albert Kahn-era designs that was compiled and given to me by current employees of Albert Kahn Associates, Inc., and this home is not on it…..but I can also tell you that the database is not infallible and there are quite a few example of confirmed Kahn designs that are also not on it. Please write us at info@ilovedetroitmichigan.com if you run into more roadblocks while researching this home’s architect of record….or if you confirm it’s a Kahn!

  8. Mr. Carlson, Dale,
    This is an amazing amount of work – well done! I gather that you’re working on some attributions. Are most of those Indian Village houses attributed, or speculated by owners? Of course lots of owners understandably want to tag their structure with the Kahn signature. My recollection of the AKA company list is that some “projects” seemed to be either renovations to works of others, or perhaps they were passed down to lesser hands. Speaking of which, I found it impossible to discern from the AKA records the extent to which Kahn himself was involved in a given building’s design. This is not uncommon in large practices with lots of designers – akin to the production houses of some of the great painters in history. We can be pretty sure about the iconic few and less sure about the next tiers. BTW, I think you’re probably more correct about the Casino than we were – probably a moment of charitable salve on our part. Lastly, I was unaware of Dr. Edgar Kahn’s retreat – what a hoot! You have added significantly to the archive.

    1. Thanks for reading, Eric. Those are some important questions, for sure. I am presently unable to devote the time necessary to write the quality answers they deserve. Let’s have a phone conversation. I’ll be emailing you. D~

  9. Dear Mr. Carlson,
    Fantastic work you have done here!
    I am looking for some information and I hope you can point me in the right direction.
    I am in search of information about a possible home that Albert Kahn may have built around 1916 for Ransom Eli Olds on Elba Island in Grosse Ille Township. I was reading a blog where someone mentioned this an provided a photo but was uncertain if he was just making a comment and not referring to the photo.
    Also, I was reading an interview with R.E. Olds granddaughter and she said this : I was born at Elbamar which is at the very south end of Grosse Ile right where it goes in to Lake Erie. That was Grandpa Olds’ summer home. She was born in 1918. Any information you might have or if you are able to direct me to a resource would be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you in advance for you time and assistance if possible.
    Sincerely,
    R. Scot

  10. I have a fence in the front of my house that I was told (by the owner I bought the house from, the owner before him put the fence in) was from an older mansion along the river. The owner put the fence in likely in the 60’s (I have an installation drawing I can check). I was always curious as to where it came from, and then noticed this weekend that the castings in my fence are identical to those in the railings of the garden court apartments (number 156 above). Any idea what home the fence could have come from? Would I assume that it was a Kahn home that was demolished?

    1. That’s an awfully tough one to prove, Dave. While it could be a minor indicator of the original architect, it is more likely that the fence was fabricated by a completely different company than the architect’s and the fence design was used at two different places by two different architects purely by coincidence. Very hard to say for certain. Compare your fence to entry #93 in our list. If there are similarities, I would be more likely to think your fence suggests AKA Inc. might’ve been involved in your lot’s development at some point.

  11. Hello,
    I am trying to find a picture of what I believe is a Kahn building. It is owned now by Tim Tharp (Checkers, Grand Trunk Pub). My husband is building an office inside and I would like to get him a nice original print. It was a dealership. They are now calling it the Kahn Cadillac. I’ve toured it and at one time it was clearly a beauty. There is a damaged pewabic pottery fountain inside if that helps. Any thoughts?
    Thanks,
    Beth

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  13. I think your articles are great ! I was at a estate sale t his week and in the basement of this old home was a old bed beautiful , I took it home and as I was setting it down the slats of the bed in big bold letters Bryant an Detwilder company Woodard gratiot Hudson building . Do you know anything about that????? As I was investigating I ran across you blog .

    1. Hi Patti, Thanks for reading ilovedetroitmichigan.com. We can’t tell you much about the Bryant & Detwiler Corporation except for the fact that they were builders in the Detroit Area in the first half of the 20th century. We know nothing of the other product they fabricated but it appears, based upon your discovery, that they made bed frames, too. Ha! Who knew? We do possess a digital version of an old catalog of their constructions from the era in which they are referenced in our Albert Kahn: 400 Buildings post. Write us at info@ilovedetroitmichigan.com if you’d like a copy. ~Eds

  14. Dear Dale Carlson, I am an architectural historian teaching at UM, and I am doing a seminar on Albert Kahn this semester. We’ve been appreciating your website immensely this semester, as I have previously. I wanted to make contact with you–if you get this, and are interested, could you send me an email?
    Many thanks, Claire Zimmerman

  15. Thank you for celebrating Albert Kahn’s work.
    Since more than 25 years I’m involved in his life and work – the outcome of this is my film ALBERT KAHN ARCHITECT OF MODERN TIMES. (You can watch it in english under http://www.filmmedia.de / architektur)
    As Claire Zimmerman, I’m teaching architectural master students here in Germany – this semester about Kahn’s 1891 journey through Italy and the next semester about Albert Kahn and Albert Speer. Both Seminars are part of our preparation to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Albert Kahn’s death.
    I would very much like to get in contact with you.
    Thanks, greetings from Marcello

  16. Dear Mr. Carlson. I’ve enjoyed your website immensely. I’ve seen in the press a handful attributions of 2937 E. Grand Blvd. to Kahn recently but have not been able to verify the claim. Was wondering what you thought and if you’ve ever looked into it?

    1. Thanks for reading and commenting, J. Schmidt. We intend to do a little research on this subject, and we’ll be starting with the staff at “Curbed Detroit”, who appear to us to be the only online source claiming this building is an AKA Inc. design. We’ll let you know what we find out in the coming weeks.

  17. You might want to check the location of “The Woodward” Apartments (1902; Mason & Kahn; demolished) judging by the picture the building was on a corner and judging by the shadows in the image it was located on the north east corner, unless the image was mirrored in which the building would have been on the north west side. The current building that occupies modern day Woodward and forest in the northeast corner has been there pre-1900’s and those roads surely have not changed. it’s more likely that the building was located at Woodward an Canfield, but thats just a guess. Could be something interesting to look into.

  18. #119 Boyer-Campbell building WAS on West Milwaukee. Boyer-Campbell Co. built their first building at 6547 St. Antoine. If you go there, in person or on Google Maps, you can still see “The Boyer Campbell Co.” over the door. I do not know if it is an Albert Khan building, but I do know that General Motors had used some of the Boyer-Campbell offices in this building while the GM building was under construction. I used to work for Boyer-Campbell. Also, to Roger Luksik who wrote you on Oct. 11, 2013, there is a building at 2843 E. Grand Blvd. that was a Packard dealership. There is a very large automobile elevator in it and extremely well built second level floor. It still stands, but it has been turned into a loft apartment building.

  19. Great effort! I owned an Albert Kahn residence at 141O Iroquois from 166 to 1975. I upgraded the heating system, completely renovated the kitchen, decorated the first two floors completely and had some rewiring done. The house was truly enjoyable for those years. I moved to Southern California and sold the house to a veterinarian who wanted to be closer to the pet market in the Grosse Points.

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